Light technology for cut flowers

The use of lighting for cut flowers provides a good yield above all in the dark months. Using growing light it is possible to produce a bigger crop. The rule of thumb is that 1% more light in the winter produces 1% more crop yield.

The way in which the product is harvested has a major effect on the choice of light uniformity. In the case of products that are harvested all at once, such as chrysanthemums and lisianthus, it is of major importance that the crop be uniform in size and shape. This requires a high level of light uniformity. In the case of products that are harvested individually, such as roses, the level of light uniformity is less important. In this case, the choice is for as high an intensity as possible and deep penetration into the crop in order to achieve as good a level of quality and quantity as possible. In the case of products whose bottom shoots need to be lit above all in order for a high production to be achieved, it is recommended that a reflector be used that has been designed to provide light penetration into the crop.

However, the use of light does not just improve quality in winter. The use of growing light also means that the crop is less susceptible to fungal diseases and infections. Moreover, the light intensity and the lighting plan ultimately determine the life of the product once it is in the vase.

What light level for what cut flower?

Chrysanthemum
Light level between 105 and 130 µmol/m²

Rose
Light level between 170 and 200 µmol/m²

Lily
Light level between 80 and 100 µmol/m²

Lisianthus
Light level between 170 and 200 µmol/m²

Alstroemeria
Light level between 60 and 105 µmol/m²

Anthurium / Orchid – cut
Light level between 80 and 105 µmol/m²

Freesia
Light level between 70 and 105 µmol/m²

Gerbera
Light level between 80 and 105 µmol/m²

Tulip
Light level between 25 and 40 µmol/m², in combination with extra blue light (such as HSE Daylight)